Research has revealed that there are significant deficits in the assessment, communication, and treatment of pain in medicine.1–4  Thus, the Joint Commission and American Academy of Pediatrics created consensus statements to set standards for pain treatment >20 years ago.5,6  Despite the increased focus on analgesia, children continue to experience inadequately treated pain while hospitalized.3,4  Specifically, pediatric racial and ethnic minorities have been shown to receive analgesia less often and experience higher pain scores. Emerging research in populations with limited English proficiency (LEP) has revealed continued deficits in adequately treated pain.7–9  Given the importance of language and communication in pain assessment, pediatric populations with LEP are at risk for significant inequities in care.

In this month’s Hospital Pediatrics, Payson et al10  examined inequities in pain assessment and management in hospitalized children with LEP as assessed by self-reported...

You do not currently have access to this content.