The recent report by Melchior et al on food insecurity raised concerns about the effectiveness of nutritional-assistance programs and highlighted the role played by maternal mental health and domestic violence. Evidence from Children's HealthWatch (www.childrenshealthwatch.org) provides additional information on the link between nutritional-assistance programs and children's health and well-being. Many income-eligible families are not reached by nutritional-assistance programs because of either bureaucratic barriers or insufficient funding.2,–,5  The evidence is clear that children benefit from nutritional-assistance programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) (formerly Food Stamps), and eligible families who do not receive WIC and SNAP benefits have greater food insecurity than those who do.3,4  Thus, the problem is with the accessibility and reach of nutritional-assistance programs, not with their effectiveness.2,–,5 

Unfortunately,...

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