Adolescents are frequently prescribed hormonal contraceptive agents for both contraceptive and noncontraceptive purposes. Over half of all sexually experienced females aged 15 to 19 have used some form of hormonal contraception: 56% oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), 20% injectable, 14% emergency, 10% patch, and 5% ring. Given that 50% of adolescent girls have been sexually active before age 18, ∼1 in 4 adolescent girls will be exposed to hormonal contraceptives by age 18. Additionally, teenagers are more likely than adult women to use hormonal contraceptives for purposes other than birth control: 33% of adolescents on OCPs use the method solely for noncontraceptive purposes.

Hormonal contraceptive agents have many noncontraceptive benefits that are of particular importance during adolescence. They decrease menstrual flow, anemia, painful periods, acne, functional ovarian cysts, as well as other menstrual-related symptoms such as premenstrual syndrome, headaches, and epilepsy. Menstrual irregularity is common among adolescent girls,...

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