In this issue of Pediatrics, Mullender-Wijnsma et al1 report findings from an intervention to evaluate the effects of physically active lessons on enhancing children’s academic achievement. Conducted in primary schools in the Netherlands, results of the study are promising. After 2 years, intervention children showed greater gains in standardized mathematics and spelling test scores compared with control children. To what extent overall activity levels and health of the children have been affected is unknown, and we look forward to results from the children’s fitness tests, which are likely forthcoming.

Globally, rates of physical activity in children are low,2,3 and schools are 1 potential setting for health promotion efforts. Indeed, physical activity interventions in primary schools have been implemented with some success.4 Although physically active lessons are 1 example of how children’s physical activity might be increased,5 it is imperative that these lessons do not...

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