Since the early 1980s, the use of assisted reproductive technology (ART) has increased dramatically worldwide.1,2 Many factors have contributed to this heightened usage, including the better availability of family planning tools, and sociocultural trends toward rising parental age at first birth. As a result, evaluating the potential consequences of ART use remains a timely and relevant topic. The first children conceived through ART are currently in their 30s, reflecting the limited amount of time the scientific community has had to assess the health impacts of these technologies on post-ART generations. Reigstad et al3 provide a fascinating analysis of ART use and cancer risk in subsequent offspring. Although previous studies have been conducted on this topic, ongoing studies capitalizing on the mounting follow-up time available on people conceived through ART are urgently warranted to assess potential increased risks of complex diseases in a timely manner.

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