Background: Virtual simulations provide opportunities for interactive learning, problem-solving, and standardized feedback. Little is known about the attitudes of healthcare workers to using mobile virtual reality (VR) simulations for newborn resuscitation training. Objective: To describe the perceptions and attitudes of healthcare workers in low resource settings towards using mobile VR simulations for neonatal resuscitation training. Methods: From July 2018 to September 2019, nine focus group discussions (FGD) with 5-8 participants per group were held with healthcare workers enrolled in the eHBB/mHBS study on using mobile VR simulations for nedwborn resuscitation training in Nigeria and Kenya. The focus group facilitators used a semi-structured interview guide designed to elicit participants’ experiences with and opinions about using mobile VR for healthcare education in a low resource setting. FGD were audio-recorded and transcribed for qualitative analysis. Data were organized using NVIVO 12 software [QSI International] was used to organize the data. Two investigators (RU, SP) independently reviewed the FGD transcripts to identify initial themes then worked together to build consensus on all major themes. As new codes were identified, the coding scheme was refined using the constant comparative method. Codes within and across transcripts were compared and synthesized into overarching themes describing the benefits and challenges of mobile VR simulations in healthcare education. Cohen’s kappa coefficient was used as a statistical measure of inter-rater agreement with kappa = 0.952 showing good agreement between coders. Results: 75 healthcare workers participated. See Table 1 for FGD demographic data. Themes on the benefits of eHBB mobile VR training included: engaging, convenient, simple and easy to use, repetition builds confidence, teaches the steps, enhances learning without stress, motivating, and translates to practice. Challenges to using mobile VR training in the LMIC setting that participants identified were lack of time, lack of infrastructure (electricity/internet), technical issues and user discomfort. Participants identified the need for additional scenarios and including features such as reminders to practice. They appreciated the role of in-person training and supervision. Conclusions: Mobile VR technology is an acceptable educational modality for nurses and midwives who provide newborn resuscitation. Acknowledgements: This project was supported by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation

Table 1

Demographics of Focus Group Participants

Table 1

Demographics of Focus Group Participants

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Figure 1

Hierarchy of Themes and Example Quotes from Focus Group Discussions

Figure 1

Hierarchy of Themes and Example Quotes from Focus Group Discussions

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